ACTA is an independent, non-profit organization committed to academic freedom, excellence, and accountability at America's colleges and universities.

ACTA is an independent, non-profit organization committed to academic freedom, excellence, and accountability at America's colleges and universities.

ACTA is an independent, non-profit organization committed to academic freedom, excellence, and accountability at America's colleges and universities.

ACTA In The News

ACTA's publications, press releases and public advocacy for academic freedom, excellence, and accountability at America's colleges and universities reach a wide audience and have been cited by national newspapers, television commentators, and by state and federal government, including Congress and the President of the United States.

CUNY Campuses Measure Up to Ivy League

New York Sun
May 13, 2004 by Jacob Gershman |
Two CUNY campuses offer a more comprehensive core curriculum than Ivy League institutions, according to a recent survey.  Titled “Hollow Core,” the survey, conducted by the Washington-based… Continue Reading >>

Campus Conduct Policies Are Stifling Free Speech,  Panelists Testify

Chronicle of Higher Education
November 7, 2003 by Eric Hoover |
Concern about campus speech codes resounded last week on Capitol Hill as panelists, testifying at a U.S. Senate committee hearing on "intellectual diversity" at colleges, argued that overbroad conduct policies… Continue Reading >>

Congress looks at campus political correctness

Townhall.com
November 3, 2003 by Herbert London |
On October 30 the Senate Committee on Education, Labor and Pensions held a hearing on “intellectual diversity” in higher education with the American Council of Trustees and Alumni president Anne… Continue Reading >>

Academic diversity lacking, panel told Democrats skip Senate hearing

Boston Globe
October 30, 2003 by Jim Geraghty |
A US Senate committee convened a hearing yesterday on "the lack of intellectual diversity in America's colleges and universities." But the panel of witnesses who testified about the issue did not appear… Continue Reading >>

Keeping College Trustees on Course

National Journal
October 11, 2003 by Neil Munro |
Governors across the country have long had the power to appoint the trustees who oversee state universities and colleges. But elected chief executives often find themselves disappointed when their chosen trustees… Continue Reading >>

Low Marks for High Marks

Wall Street Journal
September 5, 2003 by Review & Outlook |
George W. Bush, Yale '68, was kidding when he addressed the Class of 2001 at his alma mater. "To those of you who received awards and distinctions," he told the new graduates, "I say well done. And to the… Continue Reading >>

Hard Times for State Colleges

New York Times
August 31, 2003 by Letter to the Editor: Barry Latzer |
You are correct that some universities are not offering the courses that students need to graduate (editorial, Aug. 26). One reason is that faculties and administrations seem more interested in meeting the… Continue Reading >>

In Trustees We Trust

Wall Street Journal
August 1, 2003 by Review & Outlook |
In an age where the misdeeds of the Enrons and MCIs and J.P. Morgan Chases still compete for daily headlines, Americans have learned much about the critical role of corporate governance. Now a new institute… Continue Reading >>

Governors Who Act in the Public Interest

Chronicle of Higher Education
July 23, 2003 by Letter to the Editor: Jerry L. Martin |
The piece by Neal C. Johnson and Charles S. Clark, of the Association of Governing Boards of Universities and Colleges, is dripping with mandarin contempt for the democratic process ("Take the Gamesmanship… Continue Reading >>

Lawmakers at Hearing on College Accreditation System Call for More Accountability

Chronicle of Higher Education
October 2, 2002 by Richard Morgan |
A House of Representatives education subcommittee met Tuesday to assess the role of accreditation in higher education. Lawmakers largely criticized the country's 50-year-old accreditation process, claiming… Continue Reading >>

Group Criticizes Link Between Accreditation and Federal Student Aid

Chronicle of Higher Education
October 1, 2002 by Richard Morgan |
The federal government should no longer require a college to be accredited to award federal financial aid, a national group argues in a new report. The American Council of Trustees and Alumni questions the… Continue Reading >>

President Bush Announces NEH American History Initiative

National Endowment for the Humanities
September 17, 2002 by Press Release |
President Bush today launched "We the People," an initiative by the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) to encourage the teaching, studying and understanding of American history and culture. "Studies… Continue Reading >>

September 11 and Academic Freedom

National Association of Scholars
February 6, 2002 by Press Release |
The impact of the terrorist attacks of last September 11 continues to reverberate across the United States, leaving few aspects of American life unexamined and unchanged. As one might expect, a subject to receive… Continue Reading >>

Reviewing Black Studies

Newsday
February 4, 2002 by Martin C. Evans |
In 1968, SUNY Stony Brook students angry about the assassination of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. and that the role of blacks in America was virtually ignored in the university's classrooms, blocked classes… Continue Reading >>

Ambivalent Academe

New York Times
December 1, 2001 by Letter to the Editor: Jerry L. Martin & Anne D. Neal |
Our report, "Defending Civilization," documents academe's disturbingly ambivalent response to the Sept. 11 attacks. You assert that we accuse professors of anti-American statements, unpatriotic behavior… Continue Reading >>
GO TO PAGE:   ‹ First  < 76 77 78 79 80 >  Last ›

Search